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Alberto Mendez
"The InterNations events in Tel Aviv have given me a great network of friends and really fun get-togethers to attend."
Lastri Sasongko
"Making new friends and contacts in the Hague was much easier once I began to attent InterNations events."

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Safety and Security in France

France has been the target of a number of devastating terrorist attacks in recent years. Nevertheless, the country remains a comparatively safe place to live in; expats are much more likely to fall victim to a property crime than a violent one. Property crimes are particularly prevalent in big cities.

In major cities, pickpockets and con artists regularly operate at popular tourist spots or on public transportation. Expats moving to the French countryside, on the other hand, should be aware of the potential dangers caused by forces of nature: there’s a risk of wildfires in the south, of flooding along rivers and creeks, and of avalanches in the mountains.

Living with the Threat of Terrorism

The chances of falling victim to a terrorist attack are statistically significantly lower than the everyday dangers of driving a car, for example. However, the range of attacks carried out by Islamic extremist groups in the past few years have left the country shaken, resulting in a two-year state of emergency until at least November 2017. Heightened security measures and a new anti-terrorism bill which enshrines many of the emergency powers into ordinary law have followed; this makes it easier for the police and interior ministry to carry out checks and restrict the movement of people without necessarily requiring judicial approval.

Discrimination in France

The Islamic terror attacks have also fueled a rise in islamophobia in France. According to critics, the concept of laïcité — i.e. freedom of religion and the separation of state and religion — has been used to discriminate against Muslims and other religious minorities: the 2004 ban of noticeable religious signs at school and the — later abolished — ban of long swimwear at a number of beaches in 2016 hit Muslim women particularly hard. Moreover, the country continues to struggle with anti-Semitism, as well as discrimination based on gender or sexual orientation. However, there has also been a wide range of new legislation promoting gender equality, introducing the possibility to legally change your gender without requiring medical treatment, and legalizing same-sex marriage, among other things.
Alberto Mendez
"The InterNations events in Tel Aviv have given me a great network of friends and really fun get-togethers to attend."
Lastri Sasongko
"Making new friends and contacts in the Hague was much easier once I began to attent InterNations events."

Our Global Partners

France Guide Topics